DYM

 
  • DYM_logo
  • Store
  • Blog
  • Events
  • Scholarships

Tag Archives | leadership

A Ministry On Its Toes

Fantasy Football draft is coming up for me. I love the NFL. I love the fake football draft. It’s great. I remember playing organized football for the first time going into my freshmen year of high school. Everyone was running around and the coaches were doing different drills to see what skill sets everyone has so they can put them in their proper positions. I remember the hitting drill. I remember it because at first, I was awful. The first time ever hitting someone with pads in a drill was against one of the biggest guys on the team. I stood there, on my heels, as the running back ran towards me and got pummeled. DE-STROY-ED! The coaches pulled me aside and explained to me that if I were to wait on my heels and react rather than being on my toes and go towards whats coming at me, I’m going to be flat on my back every time.

Some of us in ministry, are on our heels. Things go as they go and we react to situations rather than plan ahead and act upon it. Sometimes we wait for God to open a door for our ministry to go forward when many times I feel God is just waiting for us to move forward to He can lead us where He want to take us. I am about to jump into a new role and I know God has called me to move forward. I don’t need to apologize for it. I’m going to move until God tells me, “No”. Sometimes, we assume God’s answer is automatic “no” and we look for a “yes”. Sometimes I think God is saying “Yes” and we just don’t see it and we assume the answer is a “no”, therefore we are stuck in our current place.

As leaders, we are called to be on our toes. To be leaning forward. To be on the go, always moving forward. the enemy is coming at us with everything he has and if we are caught on our heels waiting to react we will find ourselves flat on our backs. God is faithful. God is good. We are called to take our ministries forward in whatever that means for you.

Maybe it is:

  • Having that difficult conversation with that student or volunteer you have been avoiding.
  • Getting rid of a volunteer who is cancer to your ministry.
  • Starting a small group ministry but you know it’s going to be a ton of work so you have been putting it off.
  • Planning a few months ahead because right now you are just week-t0-week and you are procrastinating.
  • Changing the “sacred cow” in that ministry because you know that model is not working in your context anymore.
  • Being active in making sure the rest of the church knows what God is doing in your youth ministry because no one seems to care because most likely they don’t know.
  • Talking to your senior pastor about how you need a raise.

What is it that you have been playing on your heels for too long with? Move forward and onward because God provides for those who have enough faith to take that tough step forward.

Tags: , , ,

0

How To Deal With Lonely Leadership

At the end of a long night have you ever asked, “Why am I doing this?”  That question can stem from frustration, anger and disappointment.  That question can also stem from loneliness.

When you hit the top of the management scale it’s difficult to find encouragement and affirmation.  No one is pouring into you and all your energy is being spent on others.  Leadership can get lonely, but it doesn’t have to.  To face the loneliness you need to:

EMBRACE THE ROLE: It’s important to embrace the sacrifices and additional responsibilities that come with leadership.  In fact you need to embrace the role.  Refuse to complain and lean into the conflict that comes with it.  Not only will you be rewarded with your obedience, but you’ll find yourself less distracted.

JOIN A NETWORK: No one is going to understand how you feel better than other youth leaders.  Join a network, share war stories and pray for one another.  When you recognize that other people are facing the same struggles you are it builds solidarity.  Networks will remind you that you are not alone even if you feel lonely in leadership.

FIND A MENTOR: As a leader you are constantly pouring into others.  You need someone pouring into you.  A mentor doesn’t have to be another youth worker, it just needs to be someone:

  • You respect
  • Who has wisdom
  • You trust to give you brutal truth

To find a mentor look at your church, ask coworkers or people in your network.

LEAN ON GOD: In the end you are never alone in leadership, you just need to trust God.  He is going to lead you in and out of conflict.  He wants you to grow you just need to trust that He is in control.  Spend quiet time with God and track your journey in a journal.

Leadership can feel lonely, but it doesn’t mean you are on your own.  Own the situation and you’ll be able to move forward.

How do you deal with the loneliness that comes with leadership?

Tags: , , , ,

0

Too Much Change Too Fast Vs. Doing What You Got Hired To Do

As leaders we want to move forward and want results. But as a teammate with your staff and volunteers you want to be healthy. Coming in as the new guy there is the fine balance of changing and moving forward and not being “that guy” who comes in and does a complete overhaul on the ministry within the first few weeks. You don’t want to ruffle feathers too quickly (because I think leaders do and should ruffle feathers eventually because moving forward will scare people sometimes and leaders move forward) but you also do not want to sit on your hands and do nothing because the people who hired you didn’t hire you to do nothing. Chances are they hired you to do something and expect some sort of change in the ministry. So how do you balance this? How do we walk that tension?

Here are some thoughts about how I am going about it:

  • You are the leader and you are there to make decisions. Decisions fall on you and it’s up to you to make decisions on where you feel God is leading you and you don’t need to apologize for this.
  • I’m not making any big transitions right off the bat but I will start to meet, hang out with, coach, train our leaders to make sure we have the right people on board and we are all headed in the right direction. If I work from the inside out then when change does come on the big level, leaders will be on board and be your biggest cheerleader.
  • People are going to question decisions. It’s part of the game. What I hope is that I have communicated the vision of the ministry clearly so while they may question the decision, they would never question my intentions.
  • Change comes with resistance. Leaders push through resistance because they can see what things can be and help people to get there.
  • Leaders care for the team. They are willing to hear out, listen and be there for those they are leading, helping them to get on board with where the ministry is going. We are leaders, but we shouldn’t be ruthless. Pastors are shepherds, they gather, they move forward, they correct and they love their flock.
  • Respect the past while still moving forward. Great ministry has happened before you get there. Honor it, don’t just push it aside but don’t live by it. God has placed a vision and a passion on your heart and choose you to lead it in this time so move towards it.

If you have ever stepped into a ministry with a firm foundation, what are some things you have learned? What are the must do’s? What are the big no-no’s? How do you balance this? Comment below?

Tags: , , , , , , ,

0

Help Me Understand…

As I am getting settled in my new house, new city and getting to know my new staff I still have been meeting with people. I technically do not start my new position for another 10 days, but as of last week I still have been hanging out with my direct supervisor and every single person on the team in which I will be overseeing, as well as some great key volunteers. One, because there is only so much I can organize the house and sit at home and two, because I think it is important to get to know, see how people feel and ask them certain questions so I do not go into this new position blind. I want to be able to have somewhat of a pulse on the team and the ministry in which I am joining.

I think one of the most important things any leader will ever do is ask questions. Not only ask questions, but know how to ask good questions. Whether you are hanging out with a student, with a leader or joining a new team, asking questions allows for you to know them and them to know you. It gives them a sense that you care about what they have to say and that you are listening to them. Who doesn’t want to feel like they are being heard?

So here are the questions I have been asking everyone I meet with in some way, shape or form:

  • How are you doing right now? (Are they tired, excited, nervous, anxious, overwhelmed?)
  • What are you most nervous about the future?
  • What are you most excited about?
  • If there was only one thing you could change right away what would it be?
  • If there was one thing you think should not change because it’s really effective what would it be?
  • Can you please help me understand _________ (In conversation if there is something that does not make sense or catches you off-guard you can clarify. I always want to give the benefit of the doubt).

I’m sure there are more, but these seem to be the go-to ones for me at this point in time. Now don’t just ask the questions and that’s it. Take value, take notes and engage in conversation so when time does come for change, you know, value and understand where people are coming from.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

0

Youth Ministry Veteran Tip: Turn Questions into Content

camp_parent_packet

Earlier this summer we held our summer camp parent meeting  - it was a super fun night of videos, content and questions. But being there and working through an extended question and answer time made me remember a principle I needed to put into practice:

  1. Make sure someone records every question asked during training
  2. Make sure someone records the learnings from camp during the week
  3. Make sure someone records the leader debrief after camp

Swirl all of this together, and turn it into content for next year. You can improve the parent meeting, camp itself and parent/student experience by more than 100% each year. Take the questions and turn them into content. Take the failures from camp and turn them into improvement. Take the debrief time not just to celebrate but to anticipate the needs of next year.

If you launch life groups this fall and don’t turn your questions into training, you missed a big opportunity. If you teach a workshop at your denominational gathering and don’t have someone recording the questions so you can fill in the missing spots of your lesson, you’ll continue to train people incompletely. The reason some youth workers are great leaders is that they learn from their questions. They address questions before parents or counselors even known they had them. A decent conference speaker and a standout-memorable-ministry-changing talk is probably because she’s taken the time to incorporate the questions into her talk.

When someone raises their hand, it is an opportunity for you to improve next time!

JG

Tags: , , , , , , ,

0

4 Things To Do Before Starting A New Position

So this is my first week not in my former position, but it does not mean I am not working. I don’t begin my new position for a few weeks and I am definitely going to take advantage of it by taking my wife on vacation, but until then, I have been and am going to be hanging out with my supervisor and future team of people to get a run down on the current state and feel of ministry. There will be a time to turn off, which I’m planning on doing, but I also want to be prepared (somewhat) for this new position that I will be taking over. As I have been thinking through the meetings I have had already and the ones I know I’m going to continue to have, I have been processing the following:

Ask Questions – I have been meeting with some great people from my circle who have been leading for a long time and have been picking their brains about certain things regarding the new position. The last thing I ever want to do is assume I know what I’m doing at all times. We can all be learning something from someone and I have been asking leadership questions from some great leaders whom I know and love.

Ask More Questions – I have been meeting and hanging out with the executive pastor who I will be reporting to. He is a great leader with a great heart who cares for the ministry. We went to lunch and I got to ask him a ton of questions about the ministry, the good things and the things that need improvement. I asked about expectations, office hours, performance expectations, where do they want to see the ministry in 5 years? Question after question after question. I figure, the more I know coming in, the more I can prepare myself to make decisions and be effective right away.

Learn How To Ask Good Questions – Don’t just ask to ask. Be intentional with who you are asking and what are you asking. I want to see where volunteers are at so I ask them certain questions in certain ways. You want to see where students are at so you ask them certain questions. There is nothing better to help prepare for a new spot than asking the right questions. Learn how to do this and you will be walking in more confident.

Listen – Instead of thinking about the next question or meeting, actually listen. Staff, volunteers and students want to feel like they are being heard. When we ask questions we allow them to voice what they are feeling. Wrong or right, how they are feeling is real. So lean into that, listen, and adjust when necessary. One of the best things a leader can do coming into a new spot is be a great listener and slow to respond. Gather information, pray about it, discern and you will be able to take action when you need to when you come in being caught up on the ministry instead of coming in cold.

Tags: , , , ,

0

YS IDEA LAB: Tic Long on Leading Well

Another great in the YS Idea Lab series – this time featuring YS legend Tic Long. Such good stuff in here about leading well!

JG

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

0

Hold Your Plan Loosely

So I have been processing a ton of things lately. One of which is how we make plans and how God can and sometimes will call us away from our plans so we can live out His plan for our lives and ministry. It is just up to us whether or not we, as youth workers, will discern what He is calling us to do and where. Where ever you are in ministry, these are things to always keep in mind when doing God’s work in ministry. Hope it is helpful.

Hold Your Plan Loosely (James 4:13-15)

Our lives are not ours.

This last weekend was my last weekend on staff here at Saddleback Church (If you missed that post, you can click HERE to read what is happening!) Now it was a part of my own plan to work here at this church in HSM for 5-6 years. In my head, I thought this would be such a great opportunity to learn from some amazing ministry minds, do some great ministry and I would buy a house here, have some kids here and plant some roots. This was my plan. God blew up that plan. I know without a doubt that me taking a position at a another church was something God had in his plan for me. Looking back at how everything went down, it is undoubtably God moving and prompting. I could have stuck to my own plan, fought it, held on tight and do my own thing and possibly miss out on the great things I know God is going to do through me in the future.

When we hold so tightly to the things that we want to do, we miss out on the things God called us to do.

If God is involved, it most likely will be uncomfortable.

Many of us want to be successful in the future if we think we are not already. The trap most of us fall into is thinking that God wants the same things we want. We start to think that God wants us to be successful just like we want to be successful. But here is the thing, God is not in the success business.God is in the refining business. God is far less excited to see you be successful, but He is constantly trying to make sure we are shaped to be more and more like Jesus everyday.

Usually when God is involved, it’s going to be uncomfortable because that is how things are refined. When things are refined, they are put under fire until it gets too hot to handle and then all of the impurities come to the surface and all the nasty stuff is revealed and then it makes the item a more pure version of itself. How do you know if God is prompting you to trust Him in His plan for you? It’s probably something that makes you a little bit uncomfortable and will take faith.

Seek God First, He Gives You What You Need (Matthew 6:25-33)

You can read the whole passage for yourself, but Jesus says when we seek Him first in our plans, God will give you and your ministry everything you NEED. Not want, but NEED.

What do you need to tweak in your life to make sure you are seeking the kingdom of God first in your plans?

Tags: , , , ,

0

Difficult Conversations Are Part of Youth Ministry

For a long time I would avoid the most difficult conversations in youth ministry. I would just hope that people would “figure it out” themselves.

  • That a volunteer would figure out that their time on the team was done.
  • That the student would figure it out the changes they needed to make.
  • That the parent would realize their destructive patterns are reflected in their teenager.

I still don’t always have the guts to say the final 10% of a correcting conversation. I still cringe when I am about to say something that is of the Spirit but stings.

Confrontation isn’t something I live for, but it is something I know I have to live with.

But the longer I’m in youth ministry, the more I grasp my responsibility to gently nudge, speak truth and boldly proclaim God’s path. I pray for God’s discernment that I won’t go too far or say something that isn’t led by Him. It isn’t fun, it isn’t easy and I know I don’t always get it right. But it is a necessary part of youth ministry I should have had the strength to embrace sooner in my calling.

Blessings as you lovingly correct this week!

JG

Tags: , , , , , ,

0

God Can Speak Through Your Spouse…

“I feel like we really need to be closer to family. It kills me a little bit every time we leave family and drive back here. I’ve tried to hold back the feelings, but I just can’t and I have to tell you and I think we should consider it.”

Heavy right? What does one do when their spouse brings up moving when things are going well? I’m going to be honest, it was not an easy thing to hear coming out of mouth of my lovely wife. If I’m going to be really honest, I was a little bit angry at first. I was thinking, “Why on earth would I ever consider leaving Saddleback and the HSM team? There is such a great thing happening here. I love the team. I love the ministry. I love the church. I love what I get to do.”

I remember going into the offices and having a conversation with Josh with tears in my eyes because I didn’t really know what to do in this situation. Neither did he. So we prayed and I had quite a few follow up conversations with Kristin to make sure this was not a one time thought. It wasn’t. I was praying the next night by myself, I felt the Holy Spirit speak to me saying, “If you felt called to go to a church in Montana, Kristin would be open to have a conversation and be prayerful about what I am doing in you, don’t ignore what I’m doing in her.” Dang.

So I started to pray for her… for us.

It’s amazing what prayer can do. God can change a heart, a desire, and open up doors in which you thought would never open. Prayer is powerful and God loves to answer prayers. Over the weeks as we have been talking, praying and discussing where we feel God is leading us, we are taking a huge leap of faith. I know I am called to lead a ministry. I know I am called to lead a team. Saddleback HSM has been an instrumental part of helping me understand how a healthy and effective team. Josh and the team have showed me how to love students and run an effective student ministry. They are incredible people and amazing pastors.

This is why I have decided to accept the lead Student Ministries Pastor position at Christ’s Church of the Valley (Shift Students) in San Dimas, CA. I worked here for a few years right after college and I’m really excited to be back doing ministry in a city I love, where we will closer to both of our families, and get to work alongside some great friends. I will be overseeing Junior High and High School ministry and leading a team of great people to reach students for Christ. I am really excited/nervous/anxious for what the future brings and I am excited to see how God is going to use both Kristin and I in this new season of ministry.

Just a few things that I have learned through this process:

  • My wife is one of the bravest people I know. She had the courage to speak her mind even though she knew it would be a tough conversation.
  • I couldn’t just let this conversation pass and sweep it away because my wife would not feel comfortable with bringing up tough things again in the future.
  • When I read passages like the ones from Ephesians 5, it challenges me to love my wife, putting her needs in front of some things that I really like or enjoy, and see how God can bless those decisions.
  • Praying with your spouse is super powerful and very encouraging.
  • God knows what he is doing and looking back in the process, I can see His presence in every step of the way.
  • It’s really easy to leave things are tough, but it’s really hard to walk away from something that is really good and going well.
  • It sucks saying goodbye to people and students you have been with for years.
  • Taking leaps of faith is frightening, but God wants to bless those who put their trust in Him and follow where He is leading.

My time with DYM will still be the same and I’m excited to share my learnings and what I will take part in during this whole new process. I would appreciate any prayers you can offer our way. This is going to be quite a journey.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

8

“Humble Things” That Aren’t Humble

humble

Humility can be a huge struggle. It is something I pray for everyday because I know that pride is a killer. In some form or another, most of us have seen the damage that can be caused by a prideful heart. The problem with pride is that it starts in the heart of one person, and through their actions, affects the hearts of many, poisoning their church.

So, yes. Humility is big. But I don’t think that all of us “get” humility. Some of us strive to have the outward appearance of a humble person, but are neglecting to work on having the heart of a humble person.

If you frequent the RELEVANT Magazine site, you would have seen the article, 4 ‘Humble’ Things That Aren’t Humble. In this piece, Jayson D. Bradley (author) brings up some interesting points, calling into question some of the “Christianese” that we sometimes use to disguise our pride.

Here is a glimpse of it:

Virtues are a lot like garments; you can put them on without owning them. It’s tricky because we don’t just fool the people around us by playing dress up—we fool ourselves.

Humility is much easier to manufacture than it is to internalize, and as long as we’re more focused on humility’s appearance, we’ll never experience its transformation.

So What is Humility?

Scripture’s packed with references to humility (something God honors), and most of the time it’s used as an antonym for pride (something God despises).

The classic C. S. Lewis quote from Mere Christianity is a helpful place to start:

“True humility is not thinking less of yourself; it is thinking of yourself less.”

Humility’s simplicity is what makes it so difficult. It’s simply thinking about, promoting the interests of and celebrating others more than yourself.

Instead of focusing on others, we tend to promote, celebrate and focus on ourselves with a little self-depreciating twist to give the appearance that we really don’t take ourselves that seriously.

Like every other opinion based article, there are some things that I would push back on, but I do think that he brings up some interesting points and has started a really necessary discussion on faux-humility.

Spend some time today thinking about areas that you see pride appear. Pray for a humble heart and seek accountability.

Tags: , , , , ,

0

My To-Do List Can Wait

I got nothing done in the office today.

I’m not going to lie to you, it is a little bit frustrating. I’m the kind of person if my to-do list is not completed it’s all I’m going to think about until it’s all crossed off. I love the summer. Summer time is when students are off of school and when they are not at the beach, movies, or eating they all seem to end up in my office. Most of the time they are bored and they don’t want to go home. Sometimes it’s to hang out with the staff or they are meeting someone later. But all of the time they are in my office, sitting on my couch, hacking my phone or computer and eating my snacks while I’m getting nothing done and my to-do list is growing while my time to do it is getting shorter.

But here is the best part about this entire thing.

While I’m not getting anything done, the most important thing is getting done. Relationships.

Do I have stuff to get finished and ready by deadlines? Absolutely. Do I have emails and voice mails to tend to? Of course. Do I always have time to stop and take time to spend time with the 4 teenagers that are sitting in my office? No, I don’t. So I have to stop and remind myself:

  1. My stuff can wait.
  2. Ministry is about a relationship.
  3. They could be anywhere else on their summer days but they choose to come hang out with you.
  4. God will bless this time.

As youth workers, we know investing in relationships is what God uses to open doors in students so we have the opportunity to speak truth into their lives. It’s the relationship building that allows opportunities for students to be open to hear what God has to say, through us, in theirs lives. Taking this time could be a catalyst in a student’s relationship with the Lord. Take advantage of this time and invest in some great relationships before the summer is over.

Tags: , , , , ,

0

7 Requirements Of A Small Group Leader

We are gearing up for another round of life groups. As we speak, students are signing up for life groups and leaders are letting us know if they are returning with us for another year. New leaders are joining the team and things will be rolling really soon. As we begin recruiting new leaders for this year, here are a few things we look for in a small group leader:

Committed follower of Jesus - They need to know Jesus in order to lead students to Jesus. If they are actively seeking Him then we know they can help students do the same. We find out how they do this through our interview with every volunteer before they officially jump on with us.

Attends our church - They need to attend and call our church their home church. It does not make sense to attend one church and serve in another. You are splitting devotion. We want our leaders to bleed not only our ministry, but our church.

Has time - Leading a small group takes time commitment. It really is more than 2 hours during the midweek. Leading a small group is leading group during designated hours, plus the conversations, hang outs, games, Starbuck’s runs outside of group time.

Decision making - Leaders need to know how to make many decisions. What to do in a group setting when things get awkward, heated, silent and decide on what is the best thing to do to help push the group closer to who Jesus is.

21 or over - Our ideal leader is over the age of 21. This provides enough distance between seniors and the leader if they were to lead a senior group. Sometimes we have seniors who are leading a jr. high group and when they become freshmen, we will evaluate the leader and usually place them with a co-leader who is over 21.

Knows how to be real - One of the most important things about a small group leader is the capability to lead in discussion (not preach) and lead in being real and authentic with students. When leaders do this, students will do the same and allow Jesus to change their lives.

Knows how to have fun - Small groups with students need to be fun. There needs to be teaching, Bible, discussion and all that, but fun is a must. We want students to want to come and enjoy being there and a leader must know how to add fun in the mix. Fun breaks down walls and allows for students to be real.

Tags: , , , ,

0

What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do

There are times in ministry (and life for that matter) where I come upon a situation and I really do not know what to do. I get a very angry email from an upset parent and my first response will probably not be the best. There is a leader in which I know is not working out and I need to ask them to step down. There is a student in which seems not to get anything I have been teaching or saying and they just keep doing the same thing over and over again. There is a decision that only you can make but you don’t really want to make it because you know you are going to get back lash. I feel like I have been in a season of all of these things happening at once and I find myself just standing scratching my head thinking, “What do I even do here?”

Here is a few things I do when I do not know what to do:

Stop. Relax. Chances are it’s not the end of the world, it just feels like it. One thing I know for sure, the best decisions are not the ones out of immediate reactions of anger and annoyance.

Forget about the overall outcome. Many times just the thought of what is going to happen down the line will freeze us in making a right decision, or any decision for that matter. When we don’t get too ahead of ourselves, we stop and think, we can make the best leadership decision.

Think about the next right, immediate decision. So instead of thinking so far in the future, ask “What would be the best next decision now to get towards the solution?” We can worry about whether or not this is going to pan out and stay stuck or we can think about what the next move is and move forward.

Pray about it. Sometimes I feel like it’s really easy to skip this step. We get so caught up in the anxiety, we miss probably the most important step. We know what Philippians 4:6-7 says, “Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.” We have the power of the Holy Spirit to help guide us in decision-making. allow God’s peace to guard your heart and your mind. Give it to him.

Respond appropriately. When we give it to God and have spent some time in prayer about it, we can confidently know our decision is the best one we can make and we know we have gone about it the best way we humanly know how. Then respond appropriately and people will be able to see your leadership and how well you handle tough calls.

Tags: , , , , , ,

0

Leaps Vs. Steps: Getting Them There

What is the opposite of faith?

It’s a question that deserves to be pondered and I have been thinking about it a lot. I would have to say the answer would be:

Sight.

If you can see something, you don’t need to have faith to know it’s there. When something is not right in front of you but someone tells you it’s there up ahead, you need faith in them because you can’t see it. So the opposite of faith, I would say, is sight.

There is a difference between having faith your ministry will get to a certain point and actually helping your ministry get there. We can have all the vision in the world for where we want our ministries to go but if we don’t have practical steps to get there we will never reach it. As pastors we love to take leaps of faith. The student’s in our ministries are sometimes not ready, mature, willing to take a leap of faith because they don’t know how or because they are afraid. So it’s our responsibility to show steps to how to get where we want them to go.

So a standard goal I’m sure we want to see is for all of our students reach is to be a fully developed follower of Jesus (This is just general to get my point across but I’m sure no one can argue this is something we want to see in student’s lives). We can have all the faith and vision in the world but unless we have tangible steps for students to take to get there, it will never happen. They just don’t leap to this point in their spirituality.

So what would this be? If the goal is a fully developed follower of Jesus, what would be some practical steps in your ministry be to help get them there? They are not going to make the leap to this point but they will take easy, tangible steps.

  • They need to read Scripture. Great. Very important. Do you have a place where they can be taught how to study the Bible? A Sunday school? A small group? A resource? Or do you just say read the Bible?
  • Accountability. It’s a big deal. Do they know HOW to get it and WHY they need to have this in their life? Do you have something they can receive this in their lives?
  • Quiet times. Awesome! Just saying it is not enough. Many students don’t know how to even go about how to read the Bible and have a quiet time and pray to God. Do we just assume they know what we say when we say, “Quiet time”?
  • Sharing the Gospel. Amazing. It’s a big deal. But are we just saying, “Ok, now go out and tell your friends about Jesus” or are there ways in which we can help them take the necessary steps to get to the point where they can confidently be able to articulate the Gospel to their friends? A curriculum? Class? Book? What?

See the difference? Having vision and faith is a huge part of ministry. Without God and the Holy Spirit moving in our lives and ministries we would have nothing. But in order to get students to go from here to there, we need to make sure they are not leaping into an abyss of confusion but stepping towards a firm foundation in their faith. They will hesitate at a huge leap but they will take a simple, tangible step.

Tags: , , , , ,

0